TITLE

Censoring through public affairs officers

AUTHOR(S)
Carlson, Carolyn S.
PUB. DATE
May 2012
SOURCE
Quill;May/Jun2012, Vol. 100 Issue 3, p63
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on government agency controls as a form of censorship in the U.S. The Freedom of Information Committee of the Society of Professional Journalists conducted a survey of congressional and federal executive branch reporters, which found out that 70 percent of the respondents had to contend with government agency controls. Approximately 85 percent of respondents also stated that the public does not have access to information due to barriers to reporting practices.
ACCESSION #
77784717

 

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