TITLE

Should you be judged by what you wear to work?

AUTHOR(S)
Zarbock, Ron
PUB. DATE
May 2012
SOURCE
Enterprise/Salt Lake City;5/14/2012, Vol. 41 Issue 42, p9
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article offers tips and ideas on selecting proper office and business clothing and attire. It emphasizes the importance for clothes to be neat, clean and fit. Choosing simple or minimal jewelry and/or make-up is advised. The author also suggests choosing professional apparel that suits a specific workplace. He argues that how employees dress will influence how they are perceived by others, particularly by their boss.
ACCESSION #
76599026

 

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