TITLE

Phenotypic detection of Inducible Clindamycin resistance among the clinical isolates of staphylococcus aureus by using the lower limit of inter disk space

AUTHOR(S)
Sreenivasulu Reddy, P.; Suresh, R.
PUB. DATE
June 2012
SOURCE
Journal of Microbiology & Biotechnology Research;2012, Vol. 2 Issue 2, p258
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Clindamycin is commonly used in the treatment of serious infections, caused by macrolide (erythromycin) resistant staphylococcus aureus producing wound infections. This is very common among methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Routine antibiotic sensitivity tests for clindamycin susceptibility may fail to identify iMLSB (inducible MLSB) strains of staphylococcus aureus due to erm genes which are expressed in two important phenotypes one is inducible MLSB another is constitutive MLSB. Total of 150 staphylococcus aureus isolates from different clinical samples were subjected to routine antibiotic sensitivity testing (AST) by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion technique . All were tested for methicillin resistant by using one microgram oxacillin disc. Erythromycin disc was kept adjacent to clindamycin disc while AST and inducible clindamycin resistance was detected by D- test among the erythromycin resistant isolates as per CLSI guidelines. Out of 150 isolates 77 (51.33%) were MRSA and 73(48.67%) were MSSA. 81(54%) were erythromycin resistant, out of which 31(38.27%) isolates showed inducible clindamycin resistance; 17 (31.48%) showed constitutive resistance and 33 (40.7%) isolates gave negative D-test indicating MS phenotypes. Further it was found that high percentage of both inducible MLSB and constitutive MLSB clindamycin resistance was identified among MRSA isolates. AST by routine disk diffusion method for erythromycin and clindamycin would be misidentified as clindamycin sensitive which results in therapeutic failures.
ACCESSION #
76384987

 

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