TITLE

Formation and decay of C-60 following free electron capture by C60

AUTHOR(S)
Matejčik, Štefan; Märk, Tilmann D.; Španěl, Patrik; Smith, David; Jaffke, Thomas; Illenberger, Eugen
PUB. DATE
February 1995
SOURCE
Journal of Chemical Physics;2/8/1995, Vol. 102 Issue 6, p2516
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The results of a detailed crossed electron/molecular beam study of electron attachment to C60 molecules and electron detachment from C-60 over the range of electron energies from near zero to about 15 eV are described. It is shown by comparing the experimental data for the attachment cross sections (normalized to the absolute thermal cross sections determined using the flowing afterglow/Langmuir probe apparatus) with quantum calculations that attachment occurs at low energies in the p-wave channel, and in the d- and f-wave channels (and probably higher-order partial waves) at the higher electron energies. At electron energies above 7 eV, thermal detachment of electrons from the hot C-60 negative ions is seen to occur, and the unimolecular rate coefficients for detachment, kd, have been determined as a function of the energy of the attaching electron. Hence, by relating kd to the derived temperature of the hot C-60 ions, the electron detachment energy, Ed, has been determined as 2.6 eV, which is close to the electron affinity of C60 as measured by photodetachment from cold C-60 ions. Additionally, by combining the measured attachment rate coefficients, ka, from the previous flowing afterglow/Langmuir probe study with the kd data determined in this study, equilibrium constants for the detachment/attachment reactions have been obtained which are reconciled with those calculated using total partition functions. An important conclusion to be drawn from all these studies is that C60 very efficiently captures electrons over the wide electron energy range from about 0.2 eV to around 15 eV and retains them if the energy released in the electron capture process can be removed before thermal detachment can occur. © 1995 American Institute of Physics.
ACCESSION #
7623817

 

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