TITLE

Primed for conversion

PUB. DATE
May 2012
SOURCE
New Zealand Dairy Exporter;May2012, Vol. 87 Issue 10, p172
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article describes a property spreading over the alluvial flats near Martinborough in New Zealand, which has the versatility to switch to dairy production or dairy support. The 342 hectare property has a consistent fertilizer and pasture renewal programme. According to Blair Stevens of Property Brokers, the farm has the versatility and the capability for intensive stock finishing, dairy production, dairy support and cash cropping.
ACCESSION #
76183663

 

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