TITLE

Dycem inhibits growth of MRSA and Ecoli in 15 minutes

PUB. DATE
March 2012
SOURCE
Operating Theatre Journal;Mar2012, Issue 258, p12
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports that test results have indicated that the polymeric flooring of Dycem was proven to successfully inhibit the growth of hospital acquired infections like Escherichia coli (E. coli) and methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) after 15 minutes.
ACCESSION #
76172575

 

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