TITLE

Defining America Through the "International Theme": Nathaniel Parker Willis's Paul Fane (1857)

AUTHOR(S)
Salenius, Sirpa
PUB. DATE
October 2011
SOURCE
Studies in American Culture;Oct2011, Vol. 34 Issue 1, p51
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses various issues related to the history and culture of the U.S. by referring to Nathaniel Parker Willis' book "Paul Fane." It is stated that in the nineteenth century Americans used visual arts and literature as means for expressing ideas that could be used to define their new nation and national identity. The birth of American art and literature was closely linked with European travel.
ACCESSION #
76115596

 

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