TITLE

Allelopathic effects of Artemisia sacrorum population in typical steppe based on niche theory

AUTHOR(S)
WANG Hui; XIE Yong-sheng; CHENG Ji-min; SHE Xiao-yan
PUB. DATE
March 2012
SOURCE
Yingyong Shengtai Xuebao;Mar2012, Vol. 23 Issue 3, p673
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
By using modified Levins niche width index and Pianka niche overlap index, this paper analyzed the ecological competition between constructive and dominant species in a typical steppe. The stem-and leaf extracts from the constructive species (Artemisia sacrorum) were utilized to study their allelopathic potential on the seed germination and plant growth of the dominant species (Stipa bungeana, Thymus mongolicus, S. grandis, and Leymus secalinus), and the ecological position of A. sacrorum in the steppe succession. In the steppe, S. bungeana had the widest niche width (0.99), followed by T. mongolicus (0. 94), A. sacrorum (0. 82), S. grandis (0. 76), and L. secalinus (0.73). The niche overlap value between A. sacrorum and S. bungeana, S. bun- geana and T. mongolicus, T. mongolicus and S. grandis, and A. sacrorum and T. mongolicus was 0. 90, 0. 95, 0. 94, and 0. 86, respectively. The allelopathic effects of A. sacrorum extracts varied with their concentration. For the seed germination, root growth, and shoot growth of the dominant species, A. sacrorum extracts showed a trend of promoting at low concentrations and inhibiting at high concentrations. The extracts of A. sacrorum had a stronger promotion effect on the root growth of S. bungeana than on that of T. mongolicus, but a stronger inhibition effect on the shoot growth of T. mongolicus than on that of S. bungeana. Methanol extracts had stronger allelopathic effects than aqueous extracts. The high niche overlap between A. sacrorum and S. bungeana, and T. mongoli- cus and S. grandis indicated that the steppe community would continue succession to S. bungeana, while A. sacrorum population was only an important transitional stage during the succession. The al- lelopathic effect of A. sacrorum played a driving role in the succession process.
ACCESSION #
76115114

 

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