TITLE

Row crop conservation saves money

AUTHOR(S)
Stewart, Jennifer
PUB. DATE
April 2012
SOURCE
Western Farm Press Exclusive Insight;4/20/2012, p5
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents a conversation with agronomist Tony Vyn of Purdue Extension. Vyn cites the role of farm conservation practices in preserving soil and water and saving growers money. He mentions benefits offered by no-till and strip-till when corn follow soybeans or wheat in rotation. He suggests more integrated tillage-nutrient systems as the keys to farmers adopting conservation practices.
ACCESSION #
75973845

 

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