TITLE

Medicine men who predict the weather

AUTHOR(S)
Donovan, Bill
PUB. DATE
March 2012
SOURCE
Navajo Times;3/8/2012, Vol. 51 Issue 10, pA-7
SOURCE TYPE
Newspaper
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents information on a man in Navajo Nation, Arizona who had the ability to forecast the weather reading the actions of wild animals,the growth of vegetation and the flights of birds.
ACCESSION #
75505332

 

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