TITLE

What the web could learn from dawn of TV

AUTHOR(S)
LEARMONTH, MICHAEL
PUB. DATE
May 2012
SOURCE
Advertising Age;5/14/2012, Vol. 83 Issue 20, Special section pc-2
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article examines Internet television finance. The use of a single corporate sponsor by Internet entertainment firms to finance the production of Webisodes or other original programming is considered, particularly its resemblance to how television programs were financed in the late 1940s and early 1950s. It is noted that Internet entertainment firms are seeking to sell Internet advertising to multiple advertisers when possible.
ACCESSION #
75189286

 

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