TITLE

Do preschool children need snacks?

PUB. DATE
April 2012
SOURCE
Lakelander (Whitney, TX);4/18/2012, Vol. 25 Issue 16, p7
SOURCE TYPE
Newspaper
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the need for preschool children to eat between-meal snacks due to their calorie requirements for their health, growth and playing.
ACCESSION #
75046266

 

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