TITLE

Return to Learning: Going Back to School Following a Concussion

AUTHOR(S)
Mcavoy, Karen
PUB. DATE
March 2012
SOURCE
Communique (0164775X);2012, Vol. 40 Issue 6, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents information on a study by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), according to which 1.6 to 3.8 million sports and recreational concussions occur every year in the U.S. A large number of children sustain concussions from non-sports activities such as motor vehicle accidents, falls, and assaults. It is stated that when a student returns to school after a concussion, the school team's responsibility is to assess the needs, and make adjustments accordingly.
ACCESSION #
74734269

 

Related Articles

  • Head-to-Head With Helmets and Hearing Aids. Fifer, Rohert // ASHA Leader;7/14/2009, Vol. 14 Issue 9, p20 

    The article discusses the prevalence of concussion incidents in high school and college athletes in the U.S. It outlines the report released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) regarding the age range of athletes who have the highest risks of significant head trauma, and...

  • Free Tool Kit for Recognizing and Managing Concussions. Weber, Bruce // Coach & Athletic Director;Dec2005, Vol. 75 Issue 5, p67 

    The article reports on the Head's Up multimedia tool kit produced by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to help high school coaches deal with concussions. A number of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) related to sports and recreation are occurring every year according to the...

  • Brain Injury Awareness Month -- March 2010.  // MMWR: Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report;3/5/2010, Vol. 59 Issue 8, p235 

    The article announces that the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is encouraging school professionals, parents, coaches and athletes to learn the risks for concussions in youth sports as part of the celebration of Brain Injury Awareness Month in March 2010.

  • Alcohol-related traffic fatalities drop sharply, according to CDC.  // Nation's Health;Feb95, Vol. 25 Issue 2, p2 

    Looks at statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on the decrease in alcohol-related traffic fatalities between 1982 and 1993. The impact of greater public awareness and society's intolerance for drinking and driving; Other factors.

  • PARIS ON MADISON. Gopnik, Adam // New Yorker;9/24/2007, Vol. 83 Issue 28, p84 

    The article describes the completed renovation of the Cafe Carlyle at the Carlyle Hotel in New York City. Most striking is the restoration of murals by the artist Marcel Vertes, whose work shows influences from Picasso, Matisse, and Chagal. The murals portray a variety of scenes reminiscent of...

  • $138 billion auto crash cost; over 80% attributed to drivers with high BAC.  // Alcoholism Report;Jun93, Vol. 21 Issue 6, p6 

    Reports on the Center for Disease Control's (CDC) study calculating the economic toll of motor vehicle crashes. Alcohol related-crashes as a major factor; Property damage; Productivity losses in the workplace and home; Medical care expenses; Need for public health measures to reduce crashes.

  • CDC Study Reports Costs of Motor Vehicle Crashes.  // Professional Safety;Oct2010, Vol. 55 Issue 10, p6 

    The article reports on the study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) on costs of injuries from motor vehicle crashes in the U.S.

  • Traffic accidents top cause of work-related fatalities.  // Industrial Safety & Hygiene News;Jun2011, Vol. 45 Issue 6, p14 

    The article presents the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Morbidity and Mortality Weekly report regarding traffic accidents as the leading cause of fatality among workers and general population.

  • Protecting athletes' brains One small test has big ImPACT. Hale-Spencer, Melissa // Grassroots Editor;Summer2012, Vol. 53 Issue 2, p6 

    The article offers the author's insights on the protection of athletes from concussions, a national sports problem in the U.S. The author cites the program called by "Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports" launched by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention due to the occurrence of...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics