TITLE

Company incriminates employees

AUTHOR(S)
Shanoff, Barry
PUB. DATE
December 1997
SOURCE
World Wastes;Dec97, Vol. 40 Issue 12, p64
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Describes a pattern in which companies in the United States that face federal scrutiny for corporate environmental crimes minimize their exposure by incriminating their own employees. Darling International Inc.'s cooperation with prosecutors to obtain leniency for itself in a river pollution investigation; US Sentencing Commission's guidelines for corporations.
ACCESSION #
74681

 

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