Resistência depois da Morte: Restituindo Humanidade ao Homo Sacer

Doty, Roxanne Lynn
January 2011
Contexto Internacional;jan-jun2011, Vol. 33 Issue 1, p209
Academic Journal
This paper examines practices of bearing witness and testimony that have arisen in response to the continuing migrant deaths in the southwestern deserts of the United States. I suggest that these practices can be considered a kind of resistance in that they restore the humanity to those who have perished and in doing so acknowledge that our contemporary bordered world harbors the spirits of those of have travelled he dangerous paths created by visible and invisible boundaries. The hope for more humane policies depends upon such an acknowledgement and keeping them alive in the public memory is key to promoting change. This paper also argues for a broad conceptualization of what it means to witness and provide testimony. The practices examined range from telling migrants' stories, to providing humanitarian aid, to practices of identifying the remains of migrants who have died and thus restoring their identity.


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