TITLE

Extracorporeal circulation for port-access cardiac surgery

AUTHOR(S)
Toomasian, J.M.; Peters, W.S.; Siegel, L.C.; Stevens, J.H.
PUB. DATE
March 1997
SOURCE
Perfusion;1997, Vol. 12 Issue 2, p83
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Minimally invasive techniques for cardiac surgery are a new approach in performing some cardiac operations. Minimally invasive surgery may minimize patient discomfort, length of stay in the hospital and postoperative rehabilitation. These procedures utilize a small thoracotomy for direct visualization of the heart. However, without the use of cardiopulmonary bypass, this approach is limited to some epicardial procedures such as coronary bypass grafting, where the heart rate is pharmacologically reduced. Port-access cardiac surgery is a new approach which provides all the benefits of minimally invasive surgery without sacrificing the advantages of cardiopulmonary bypass and myocardial preservation. Port-access cardiac surgery uses an anterior mediastinotomy and thoracic ports in conjunction with a specially designed set of endovascular catheters. These catheters provide a mode to arrest, preserve and vent the heart through an endoaortic occlusion balloon positioned in the ascending aorta, A pulmonary artery vent and coronary sinus cardioplegia catheter can also be used. These endovascular catheters, integrated with a modified heart-lung machine, provide complete cardiopulmonary support through extrathoracic cannulae inserted in a femoral artery and vein. Maintenance and monitoring of this endovascular cardiopulmonary bypass system requires the use of a kinetic pump in the venous drainage line to augment return to the heartAlung machine. Special guidelines and management parameters exist to optimize bypass with this catheter system. Using this system, port-access, minimally invasive surgery can be applied to a wider range of both epicardial and intracardiac procedures.
ACCESSION #
7392839

 

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