TITLE

Response of Eight Maple Cultivars (Acer spp.) to Soil Compaction and Effects of Two Rates of Pre-plant Nitrogen on Tree Establishment and Aboveground Growth

AUTHOR(S)
Fair, Barbara A.; Metzger, James D.; Vent, James
PUB. DATE
March 2012
SOURCE
Arboriculture & Urban Forestry;Mar2012, Vol. 38 Issue 2, p64
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents a study that assessed the effects of soil compaction on the aboveground growth of maple cultivars, and compared pre-plant nitrogen rates on the establishment and growth of trees planted into compacted soils. The authors concluded that the most significant factor affecting growth response to compacted soil is plant species. They also said that while applying nitrogen increased leaf dry weight and area, it did not increase tree height and caliper growth or stem dry weight.
ACCESSION #
73784897

 

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