TITLE

A Blend of Chlorophytum Borivilianum and Velvet Bean Increases Serum Growth Hormone in Exercise-Trained Men

AUTHOR(S)
Alleman Jr., Rick J.; Canale, Robert E.; McCarthy, Cameron G.; Bloomer, Richard J.
PUB. DATE
January 2011
SOURCE
Nutrition & Metabolic Insights;2011, Issue 4, p55
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Background: Several isolated ingredients have been proposed to increase growth hormone (GH) release, including Chlorophytum borivilianum and Velvet bean. A combination of these two ingredients has been packaged within an investigational dietary supplement. It was the purpose of the present investigation to determine the impact of acute ingestion of this supplement on circulating GH in healthy, exercise-trained men. Methods: Fifteen men ingested the dietary supplement on two different days, separated by one week. Blood was collected from subjects before ingestion of the supplement and at 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, and 120 minutes post ingestion. GH was analyzed in serum samples using an ELISA method. Values for GH for each subject, at each collection time, were averaged over both test days and used in the main analysis. Results: Serum GH increased over time, with higher values at 60 minutes (1.56 ± 0.65 ng ⋅ mL-1; P = 0.04; +767%), 80 minutes (1.76 ± 0.69 ng ⋅ mL-1; P = 0.02; +878%), and 100 minutes (1.48 ± 0.62 ng ⋅ mL-1; P = 0.05; +722%) compared to pre ingestion (0.18 ± 0.04 ng ⋅ mL-1). A great deal of subject variability existed in the area under the curve (AUC) for GH, with pooled values ranging from 0.49 to 61.2 ng ⋅ mL-1 ⋅ 2 hr-1. Conclusion: Acute ingestion of an investigational dietary supplement containing the active ingredients Chlorophytum borivilianum and Velvet bean results in an increase in circulating GH in exercise-trained men. Additional placebo controlled investigations are needed to extend these findings. Moreover, studies are needed to determine if chronic use of such supplementation leads to favorable changes in health-related parameters associated with increased circulating GH.
ACCESSION #
73508217

 

Related Articles

  • GROWTH HORMONE SURGE. Stoppani, Jim // Joe Weider's Muscle & Fitness;Nov2003, Vol. 64 Issue 11, p182 

    Provides information on various growth hormone supplements. Mucuna pruriens; Alpha glycerylphosphorylcholine; L-arginine.

  • THIS IS YOUR BRAIN ON DOPE.  // Muscle & Performance;Nov2013, Vol. 5 Issue 11, p16 

    The article offers information on several supplements that help increase dopamine level even when dieting which include mucuna pruriens, 5-hydroxytryptophan, and tyrosine.

  • Supplement use may not be associated with better food intake in all population groups. Pelletier, David L.; Kendall, Anne // Family Economics & Nutrition Review;1997, Vol. 10 Issue 4, p32 

    Discusses the result of the study comparing the effectiveness of food supplement use and nutrient intake in population groups of the United States. Data from the 1989-1991 Continuing Survey of Food Intakes of Individuals; Positive association between supplement use and nutrient densities;...

  • GH Boosters & Busters. Lefavi, Bob // Joe Weider's Muscle & Fitness;Feb2003, Vol. 64 Issue 2, p154 

    Presents information on the foods and food supplement that increase human growth hormone (hGH) release in bodybuilders. Functions of hGH; Factors that influence the spike in hGH; Interaction between hGH and its binding proteins.

  • Tricarboxylic-Acid-Cycle Intermediates and Cycle Endurance Capacity. Brown, Amy C.; MacRae, Holden SH.; Turner, Nathan S. // International Journal of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism;Dec2004, Vol. 14 Issue 6, p720 

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether ingestion of a multinutrient supplement containing 3 tricarboxylic-acid-cycle intermediates (TCAIs; pyridoxine-alpha-ketoglutarate, malate, and succinate) and other substances potentially supporting the TCA cycle (such as aspartate and...

  • Differential Dietary Nutrient Intake according to Hormone Replacement Therapy Use: An Underestimated Confounding Factor in Epidemiologic Studies? Marie-Noël Vercambre; Agnès Fournier; Marie-Christine Boutron-Ruault; Françoise Clavel-Chapelon; Virginie Ringa; Claudine Berr // American Journal of Epidemiology;Dec2007, Vol. 166 Issue 12, p1451 

    Observational studies and randomized controlled trials have produced divergent results concerning the effect of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on cardiovascular disease and, to a lesser extent, dementia. Residual confounding (confounding that remains even after adjustment for various...

  • Effect of high levels of intense sweetener intake in insulin dependent diabetics on the ratio of dietary sugar to fat: a case-control study. Cullen, M.; Nolan, J.; Moloney, M.; Kearney, J.; Lambe, J.; Gibney, M. J. // European Journal of Clinical Nutrition;Oct2004, Vol. 58 Issue 10, p1336 

    Objective: To examine the influence of intense sweetener consumption on nutrient intakes in insulin dependent diabetics compared to controls. Design: Case-control food consumption survey. Setting: Dietary data were collected from individuals in Ireland between 1998 and 1999. Subjects: Diabetics...

  • The Role of Growth Hormone on Growth of Children with Cystic Fibrosis. Haghighat, Mahmood; Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Karamizadeh, Zohreh; Kashef, Sara; Ghahramani, Farhad // Iranian Journal of Medical Sciences;Sep2009, Vol. 34 Issue 3, p223 

    The article discusses a study which examines the significance of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on the growth of children with cystic fibrosis (CF). It notes that 12 prepubertial children with CF are studied and are diagnosed in three divided stages based on clinical presentation. In...

  • Dietary Supplements: A Definition that is Black, White, and Gray. Onel, Suzan // American Journal of Law & Medicine;2005, Vol. 31 Issue 2/3, p341 

    Explores the ambiguities in the definitions of dietary substance, ingestion, and conventional foods, as well as the scope of the drug exclusion from the dietary supplement definition in order to take advantage of the more lenient rules for marketing a dietary supplement in the U.S....

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics