TITLE

Teat seals adding to mastitis armoury

PUB. DATE
July 2002
SOURCE
Farmers Weekly;7/26/2002, Vol. 137 Issue 4, p5
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on the success of a non-antibiotic teat seal, designed to keep mastitis-causing bacteria out of a cow's teats.
ACCESSION #
7314636

 

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