TITLE

Retailers' bold move to customer-centric brands

AUTHOR(S)
Mitchell, Alan
PUB. DATE
August 2002
SOURCE
Marketing Week;8/22/2002, Vol. 25 Issue 34, p30
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Comments on British retailers' shift away from traditional product focus toward customer-centric brands in their marketing strategy. Competition between retailers rather than within the supply chain for customers and their loyalty; Challenge for brand manufacturers; Consumer category management.
ACCESSION #
7294789

 

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