TITLE

It is ironic that the secretary of state encourages NHS managers to go out and publicly defend the NHS given the damage he and his colleagues have done by being overtly critical of it to win political advantage

AUTHOR(S)
Keighley, Tom
PUB. DATE
April 2002
SOURCE
Nursing Management - UK;Apr2002, Vol. 9 Issue 1, p3
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses the recruitment problems with the nursing profession by the National Health Service in Great Britain. Projections on the demand for nurses in the country; Measures that can be taken to address the concern; Factors contributing to the problem.
ACCESSION #
7292576

 

Related Articles

  • Action on Health Visiting in London.  // Community Practitioner;May2010, Vol. 83 Issue 5, p4 

    The article reports on the health visiting strategy presented by the National Health Service (NHS) to address staff shortages in Great Britain. It mentions that the strategy includes a faster route into the profession for non-nurses, a health visiting career framework for community practitioners...

  • Record numbers fall for recruitment advert.  // Nursing Standard;8/18/2004, Vol. 18 Issue 49, p4 

    Reports that an advertisement showing a young man with epilepsy falling in slow motion has become the most successful National Health Service's recruitment campaign to date.

  • Record numbers fall for recruitment advert.  // Nursing Standard;8/18/2004, Vol. 18 Issue 49, p4 

    Reports that an advertisement showing a young man with epilepsy falling in slow motion has become the most successful National Health Service's recruitment campaign to date.

  • Return to the future. Lavery, Irene; Cook, Fiona; Laing, Janice; Rae, Ann; Kilbride, Lynn // Nursing Management - UK;Oct2004, Vol. 11 Issue 6, p36 

    Reports on the success of the return-to-practice (RTP) programmes for nurses, the recruitment and retention strategy developed by Scottish Executives. Objectives of the Scottish group formed to review and re-design existing RTP programmes; Actions taken by Great Britain's National Health...

  • National guidance urged on minimum staff levels. Agnew, Thelma // Nursing Standard;11/10/2004, Vol. 19 Issue 9, p9 

    Reports on a study on the privation of nurses for national guidance on minimum staffing levels to improve patient safety and reduction of the massive toll of adverse incidents in the Great Britain National Health Service. Identification of inadequate staffing levels; Influence of the association...

  • Making your vote count. Meehan, Fiona // Journal of Community Nursing;May2005, Vol. 19 Issue 5, p3 

    Discusses the pledges of several British political parties for the health care sector in conjunction with the national election in 2005. Expansion of recruitment and retention of medical personnel; Career development of nurses; Increase in investment at the British National Health Service.

  • Mind the gap: the policy response to the NHS nursing shortage. Finlayson, Belinda; Dixon, Jennifer; Meadows, Sandra; Blair, George // BMJ: British Medical Journal (International Edition);9/7/2002, Vol. 325 Issue 7363, p541 

    Comments on efforts of the government of Great Britain to begin local and national initiatives to address problems of recruiting and retaining nursing staff. Efforts of universities to fill places on nursing diploma and degree courses; Recruitment of students from abroad; Workforce development...

  • Establishing a sustainable nursing workforce. Knowles, Judie // Nursing Management - UK;Jul2010, Vol. 17 Issue 4, p34 

    Occupational sustainability in healthcare services involves meeting the demands of a changing NHS without compromising the health and wellbeing of nurses. This article examines occupational sustainability in the nursing profession, focusing on issues of nursing workload, employee health and...

  • Mind the gap: the extent of the NHS nursing shortage. Finlayson, Belinda; Dixon, Jennifer; Meadows, Sandra; Blair, George // BMJ: British Medical Journal (International Edition);9/7/2002, Vol. 325 Issue 7363, p538 

    Comments on the efforts of the National Health Service of Great Britain to recruit and retain nursing and midwifery staff. Problem of high turnover rates, low pay for workers, and low morale; Impact of the problem in inner cities and teaching trusts; Registration of graduate nurses to practice.

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics