TITLE

Health trials: Employees should know what they're in for

PUB. DATE
July 2002
SOURCE
Industrial Safety & Hygiene News;Jul2002, Vol. 36 Issue 7, p16
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Explores how well-informed volunteers for clinical trials are. Knowledge on the risks of study participation; Percentage of volunteers who didn't know what to ask at the onset of the trial.
ACCESSION #
7277293

 

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