TITLE

Preventing cells from committing suicide

PUB. DATE
June 1998
SOURCE
USA Today Magazine;Jun98, Vol. 126 Issue 2637, p4
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on the prevention of apoptosis or programmed cell death. Why human cells commit suicide; Advantage of apoptosis; Factor that triggers cellular suicide.
ACCESSION #
726899

 

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