TITLE

The Slow Migration from Science to Policy

AUTHOR(S)
Hannibal, Mary Ellen
PUB. DATE
January 2012
SOURCE
High Country News;1/9/2012, Vol. 43 Issue 22, p16
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the federal forest plan program to protect pronghorn travel and wildlife corridors in the U.S. It notes that the wildland network is aimed to create megalinkages of animal ecology and habitat along the eastern seaboard of underdeveloped area or strategically placed migration routes. However, some scientists have also feared that linkages in wildlife corridors might just encourage the spread of invasive species.
ACCESSION #
70868115

 

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