TITLE

Sexed semen to end need for dairy Xs?

AUTHOR(S)
Buss, Jessica
PUB. DATE
June 2002
SOURCE
Farmers Weekly;6/7/2002, Vol. 136 Issue 23, p50
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports on the potential influence of sexed semen in reducing the number of dairy cross replacements for the beef industry according to Jim Hyslop of Great Britain's Agricultural Development and Advisory Service. Benefits of male sexed semen to milk producers; Source of income generation from using male sexed in suckler herds; Cost of male sexed semen.
ACCESSION #
7072334

 

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