TITLE

Tagging no doddle

AUTHOR(S)
Wright, Shelley; Buss, Jessica
PUB. DATE
June 2002
SOURCE
Farmers Weekly;6/7/2002, Vol. 136 Issue 23, p42
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports that regulations in all sheep having to be tagged before they move off farms could result in welfare problems according to John Vipond, an Edinburgh, Scotland-based specialist sheep veterinarian. Key problem posed by tagging sites; Tips on ensuring sheep health in the tagging practice.
ACCESSION #
7072325

 

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