TITLE

LANGUAGES

PUB. DATE
January 2011
SOURCE
Alaska Almanac;2011, Issue 33, p122
SOURCE TYPE
Almanac
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article offers information about languages used in Alaska. Aside from English, the state's languages include 20 Native American languages. Many natives in Western and Northern Alaska widely use the Eskimo language group comprised of Cenral Yup'ik, Siberian Yupik and Inupiaq. Some Native languages are at risk of extinction and these include Han, Haida, Eyak, Tanana, Tlingit, Dena'ina, Ahtna, Ingalik, Holikachuk, Tsimshian, Koyukon, Upper Kuskokwim, Upper Tanana, Gwich'in, and Aleut.
ACCESSION #
70469084

 

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