TITLE

FOREWORD: WHERE AM I?

AUTHOR(S)
Masters, David
PUB. DATE
September 2011
SOURCE
Interpretation Journal;Autumn2011, Vol. 16 Issue 2, p3
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
An introduction is presented in which the editor discusses various reports within the issue on topics including an overview of contemporary cartography, exploring the London Underground map, and how Stadmuseum (STAM) in Ghent, Belgium draws on the past, present, and the future of mapping to create its museum display.
ACCESSION #
70191994

 

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