TITLE

New York Supreme Court Rejects Defamation Claim Against AIDS Activist for Calling Journalist Who pports HIV Denialism a "Liar."

AUTHOR(S)
Garner, Kelly
PUB. DATE
December 2011
SOURCE
Lesbian -- Gay Law Notes;Dec2011, p262
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses a court case wherein the journalist plaintiff filed a defamation lawsuit against a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) activist for making libelous statements. The New York State Supreme Court ruled that the plaintiff failed to show that the comments were made with actual malice. When allegedly libelous statements are of public concern, the plaintiff must clearly prove that the defendant's actions were grossly irresponsible.
ACCESSION #
70088744

 

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