TITLE

RE-EVALUATING COLONIZATION AND CULTURAL CHANGE DURING THE EARLY ARCHAIC PERIOD IN NORTHWESTERN OHIO

AUTHOR(S)
Chidester, Robert C.
PUB. DATE
November 2011
SOURCE
Archaeology of Eastern North America;2011, Vol. 39, p109
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
David Stothers and his colleagues (Stothers 1996; Stothers, Abel and Schneider 2001) have hypothesized that northern Ohio experienced two parallel waves of colonization during the Paleoindian and Early Archaic periods. They argue that the almost exclusive use of southernderived lithic raw materials for tool manufacture in northern Ohio during the Gainey Phase of the Paleoindian period and the initial Kirk Horizon and Large Bifurcated Point Complex of the Early Archaic period indicates that population groups from centra! and southern Ohio were moving into the region during these times. During both periods, the initial use of exotic raw materials gave way over time to the predominant use of local raw materials as these populations "settled in " to the region and became familiar with local resources. Stothers, Abel and Schneider (2001) further speculate that the previously existing late Paleoindian populations in the region either moved north (following changing ecological zones) or were culturally subsumed by the southern populations during the Early Archaic colonization event. However, the data presented by Stothers and his colleagues is not as conclusive as they suggest, and the hypothesis of parallel colonizations deserves to be revisited. Data is presented from the Limes site in Lucas County, where four of the six Early Archaic-period points were manufacturedfrom local chert sources while only two were made from non-local raw materials. This assemblage, while too smalt to represent a statistically significant anomaly, emphasizes a discrepancy between the available data and the parallel colonizations hypothesis put forth by Stothers et al.
ACCESSION #
70080565

 

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