TITLE

Korean Family Registration in Manchukuo: Status of Korean People and Extraterritorial Rights of Japanese Subject

AUTHOR(S)
Endo, Masataka
PUB. DATE
October 2011
SOURCE
Asian Economies;Oct2011, Vol. 52 Issue 10, p36
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
No abstract available.
ACCESSION #
69911491

 

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