TITLE

What you can--and can't--do to rein in political speech at work

PUB. DATE
December 2011
SOURCE
HR Specialist: Florida Employment Law;Dec2011, Vol. 6 Issue 12, p7
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article offers tips for developing a policy that can reduce political speech in the workplace without violating the First Amendment and the National Labor Relations Act in the U.S. It state that employers can limit political expressions that negatively impact productivity or customer relations. It emphasizes the importance of consistency in the implementation of the policy. It also suggests that employers should refrain from forcing employees to vote for a specific candidate.
ACCESSION #
69905350

 

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