TITLE

Antispasmodics and antidepressants were each effective in the irritable bowel syndrome; bulking agents were not

AUTHOR(S)
Baicus, Cristian; Voiosu, Theodor
PUB. DATE
December 2011
SOURCE
ACP Journal Club;12/20/2011, Vol. 155 Issue 6, p6
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the use of antispasmodic drugs, antidepressant drugs and bulking agents in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). A meta-analysis of studies that compared these drugs with placebo in patients who had IBS diagnosed clinically or using other diagnostic criteria is included. The results show that antispasmodic and antidepressant drugs were better than placebo for improving abdominal pain, symptom scores and global assessments.
ACCESSION #
69859166

 

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