TITLE

Farm systems must coexist

PUB. DATE
November 2011
SOURCE
Farmers Weekly;11/18/2011, Vol. 156 Issue 21, p62
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The author suggests the need for both conventional and organic farming to coexist or the food supply market is going to be in trouble. He points out the value of realizing a place and market for all types of farming. He acknowledges the validity of the views of both conventional and organic farmers, and thinks that organic farmers cannot produce enough cheap food to meet the public's needs and for food security.
ACCESSION #
69666297

 

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