TITLE

ELECTIONS MATTER

AUTHOR(S)
Gerhardt, Michael J.
PUB. DATE
September 2011
SOURCE
Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy;Fall2011, Vol. 34 Issue 4, p827
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article offers information and opinions about the role of U.S. courts in the democratic process. The author offers personal recollections of his experience at the 2010 Federalist Society National Lawyers Convention and discusses judicial modesty about the democratic process in the U.S. Supreme Court in court cases such as Gibbons v. Ogden, Gonzales v. Raich, and United States v. Comstock.
ACCESSION #
69651130

 

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