TITLE

Designers don't take for granted where dog sits

AUTHOR(S)
Anglebrandt, Gary
PUB. DATE
June 2002
SOURCE
Automotive News;6/17/2002, Vol. 76 Issue 5987, p4D-P
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on the survey of automobile designers to obtain information about the seating patterns of automobile buyers in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. Factors to influence the seat selection of an occupant; Seat intended for the pets; Size of groceries to be carried in the minivans.
ACCESSION #
6949700

 

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