TITLE

NMSU researchers dig into weed and worm conspiracy

AUTHOR(S)
Rodman, Jay
PUB. DATE
November 2011
SOURCE
Southwest Farm Press;11/17/2011, Vol. 38 Issue 22, p18
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on a study conducted by researchers from New Mexico State University (NMSU) in New Mexico about the symbiotic relationship between the nematode worm and the two nutsedge weeds. According to the researchers, there is a positive correlation between the density of nutsedge plants in an area of a field and the level of concentration of the nemotode. It also notes that chile peppers and cotton are seriously affected by the southern root-knot nematode.
ACCESSION #
67408038

 

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