TITLE

PUBLIC HEALTH SYSTEM RESPONSIVENESS TO REFUGEE GROUPS IN NEW ZEALAND: ACTIVATION FROM THE BOTTOM UP

AUTHOR(S)
Mortensen, Annette
PUB. DATE
June 2011
SOURCE
Social Policy Journal of New Zealand;Jun2011, Issue 37, p123
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
From 1987 onwards the New Zealand Government has offered resettlement places to the most vulnerable refugees in refugee camps. These include women at risk, those with medical conditions and disabilities, and those categorised by the United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) as having “poor integration potential”; for instance, those who are pre-literate, women-led households with large numbers of children and long-stayers in refugee camps. The changes to refugee resettlement policy have significantly increased the number, dependency and cultural, religious and ethnic diversity of the refugees settled since 1992. However, while specifically prioritising refugees with high health and social needs, New Zealand has not yet developed the institutional means to include diverse ethnic groups in policy, strategy and service planning. This article looks at the role of public institutions in New Zealand, in this case the public health system, in the integration of refugees. The study shows that, for refugee groups, the health sector has developed responses to local needs and demands in highly specific health care settings that are often poorly resourced. Of interest in the study are the interactions between the health practitioners and provider organisations advocating for better services for refugee groups, and the institutional responses to the issues raised by health providers.
ACCESSION #
67367246

 

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