TITLE

NUTRITIONAL EVALUATION OF FICUS CARICA INDIGENOUS TO PAKISTAN

AUTHOR(S)
Khan, M. N.; Sarwar, A.; Adeel, M.; Wahab, M. F.
PUB. DATE
May 2011
SOURCE
African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition & Development;May2011, Vol. 11 Issue 3, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The nutritional composition of Ficus carica commonly known as fig is of great interest as it is considered a good source of energy and minerals. Seven samples of fig, cultivated in Pakistan were studied for their physico-chemical properties. All samples had little moisture, less amounts of ash and high volatile matters. Low moisture is favorable in preventing the fermentation of the fruit while high volatiles are responsible for its unique taste. The energy content of the samples ranged between 337.60 - 364.70 kcal/100g. The samples were found to be a good source of potassium (3.82-6.11 g/kg), magnesium (0.11-0.20 g/kg), calcium (78.72-132.80 mg/kg) and sodium (5.58-17.69 mg/kg). The mineral and trace contents of the indigenous samples were compared with the samples cultivated in the USA, Turkey and Iran. The samples cultivated in Pakistan were found to have good nutritional values especially higher calorific value and iron content compared to the reported data. The Ca/P ratio in the indigenous variety lies as recommended by nutritionists. This feature made the indigenous variety distinct as the patients suffering from stone formation in kidney may also use it safely. The high potassium in fig is beneficial not only to patients of hypertension but also prevents the bones from rapid thinning by neutralizing the increased urinary calcium loss. Significant correlations were found between iron and potassium, copper and potassium and zinc and copper (p<0.05). The positive correlations are either due to higher uptake of metals by the plant or the excess availability of the metals in the soil. Analysis of means (ANOM) was applied to evaluate the compositional variations between the samples. The study provides an overview of the physico-chemical properties of fig samples indigenous to Pakistan. The results offer useful information not only to consumers who want to buy the best quality fruit, but also to producers interested in increasing the competitiveness of fig cultivation.
ACCESSION #
67074924

 

Related Articles

  • NUTRITIONAL EVALUATION OF FICUS CARICA INDIGENOUS TO PAKISTAN. Khan, M. N.; Sarwar, A.; Adeel, M.; Wahab, M. F. // African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition & Development;Sep2011, Vol. 11 Issue 5, p5187 

    The nutritional composition of Ficus carica commonly known as fig is of great interest as it is considered a good source of energy and minerals. Seven samples of fig, cultivated in Pakistan were studied for their physico-chemical properties. All samples had little moisture, less amounts of ash...

  • healthy solutions. under PRESSURE. Bowden, Jonny // Better Nutrition;Jul2011, Vol. 73 Issue 7, p24 

    The article reports on the role that potassium plays in helping to to reduce blood pressure in patients with hypertension. A discussion of several foods, including Swiss chard, spinach and orange juice, that contain high levels of potassium and would be beneficial for patients with hypertension,...

  • 6. Recommendations on potassium, magnesium and calcium. Burgess, Ellen; Lewanczuk, Richard; Bolli, Peter; Chockalingam, Arun; Cutler, Heather; Taylor, Gregory; Hamet, Pavel // CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal;5/04/99 Supplement, Vol. 160, p35 

    Objective: To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations on the consumption, through diet, and supplementation of the cations potassium, magnesium and calcium for the prevention and treatment of hypertension in otherwise healthy adults (except pregnant women). Options: Dietary...

  • feast on figs. Bhide, Monica // Better Nutrition;Sep2006, Vol. 68 Issue 9, p48 

    The article presents information about figs. Figs are fleshy fruits that are a good source of potassium, calcium and iron, and have more fiber than any other fruit or vegetable. Naturally fat- and sodium-free, dried figs contain even higher concentrations of nutrients like magnesium,...

  • Fermentation and characterization of wine from dried Ficus carica (L) using Saccharomyces cerevisiae NCIM 3282. Kadam, N. U.; Upadhye, A. A.; Ghosh, J. S. // International Food Research Journal;Nov2011, Vol. 18 Issue 4, p1569 

    Dried figs or Ficus carica (L) are nutritionally rich fruit. Figs are one of the highest sources of calcium and fiber along with copper, manganese, magnesium, potassium, calcium and vitamin K besides being good source of flavonoid and polyphenols including gallic acid chlorogenic acid, syringe...

  • Tactic to lower blood pressure: Try magnesium.  // Swim Magazine;Jul/Aug98, Vol. 14 Issue 4, p16 

    Presents information on nutrition. Effect of magnesium on high blood pressure; Details on studies on magnesium; Ideal daily dosage of magnesium intake.

  • Test Yourself. Wrightson, Cassandra // Health (Time Inc. Health);Sep99, Vol. 13 Issue 7, p28 

    Provides information on minerals. When to take iron supplements; Details on the mineral content of mineral water; Sources of potassium and magnesium.

  • 2 LITTLE? 2 nutrients to get more of. LIEBMAN, BONNIE // Nutrition Action Health Letter;Sep2015, Vol. 42 Issue 7, p9 

    The article discusses how one can get potassium and magnesium from food, with blood pressure and risk of stroke lowered when one gets enough potassium and risk of type two diabetes lessened when one gets enough magnesium. Topics discussed include higher potassium intake possibly addressing...

  • DEVELOPMENT OF SYRUP AND "MALT-LIKE" DRINK FROM Raphia hookeri SAP. Mintah, B. K.; Eliason, A. E.; Barimah, J.; Oldham, J. H. // African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition & Development;May2011, Vol. 11 Issue 3, p1 

    Natural microflora fermentation causes changes in freshly tapped palm sap and therefore makes its storage, transport, and large scale use difficult. This study was aimed at developing stable and value added products, including syrup and non-alcoholic "malt-like" drink from the sap of palms. The...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics