TITLE

IFA Seeks Protective Language in Proposed E-Verify System Expansion

AUTHOR(S)
WEIKEL, WAYNE
PUB. DATE
October 2011
SOURCE
Franchising World;Oct2011, Vol. 43 Issue 10, p31
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the International Franchise Association's (IFA) argument in support of protective language in U.S. law for firms that use E-Verify, a program administered by the U.S. government to help employers verify the work authorization of new workers. Concerns are expressed about how employees rejected as a result of non-confirmation by E-Verify could have cause to file a discrimination or wrongful termination suit. States where the program is required for all employers are listed.
ACCESSION #
67064981

 

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