TITLE

WMD Report: Capability, Intent Exist for Non-State Actors to Create, Deliver Bio-Weapons

PUB. DATE
October 2011
SOURCE
TR2: Terror Response Technology Report;10/26/2011, Vol. 7 Issue 22, p4
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents the Bio-Response Report Card which centers on a strategic assessment of U.S.' ability to respond to a biological event which range from detecting an attack or disease outbreaks to conducting environmental cleanup. The report card starts with an assessment of biological threats in the 21st century and claims that technically competent groups can obtain deadly pathogens and create bio-weapons. It indicates that budget cuts will damage the community of bio-defense experts.
ACCESSION #
66860107

 

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