TITLE

FREE WAY

AUTHOR(S)
Flanagan, Joe
PUB. DATE
December 2010
SOURCE
Common Ground (10879889);Winter2010, p26
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents a historical profile of the Alaskan Way Viaduct in Seattle, Washington, an elevated highway built in the waterfront area of the city starting in 1949. A detailed description of the design of the Viaduct is provided, focusing on the engineering elements used in its Battery Street Tunnel. The article also discusses its role in easing traffic congestion to the city and examines its future, and other elements of the U.S. interstate highway system, in historic preservation.
ACCESSION #
66807708

 

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