TITLE

South Yorkshire Cohort: a 'cohort trials facility' study of health and weight - Protocol for the recruitment phase

PUB. DATE
January 2011
SOURCE
BMC Public Health;2011, Vol. 11 Issue 1, p640
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article offers information on the South Yorkshire Cohort health and weight study. It states that the study aims to recruit 20,000 people who will be invited through letters from their general practitioners. It mentions that participants will be eligible if they are between 16-85 years old, registered with one of the pratices of South Yorkshire, England. It highlights that first wave of data will be collected during 2010-2012 and further are planned at intervals of 2-5 years.
ACCESSION #
66594646

 

Related Articles

  • Government advisers doubt value of GP exercise plans. Hairon, Nerys // Pulse;3/5/2005, Vol. 65 Issue 9, p8 

    Reports on the controversy over the campaign of the Department of Health to make exercise promotion a routine part of the work of general practitioners in Great Britain. Purpose of the campaign; Reaction of the Health Development Agency to the plan; Question over the effectiveness of brief...

  • DOCTOR'S NEW ORDERS. Apallas, Alexa K. // Joe Weider's Muscle & Fitness Hers;May2004, Vol. 5 Issue 4, p21 

    Focuses on the role of primary-care doctors in addressing obesity among adults in the U.S. according to a report released by the periodical "Archives of Internal Medicine." Need for doctors to focus on counseling their patients to lead a healthy lifestyle.

  • GPs' workload set to soar as obesity doubles CUD. Kelly, Brian // Pulse;9/6/2004, Vol. 64 Issue 35, p20 

    Reports on the increase in the workload of general practitioners (GP) with the heightened obesity epidemic among the middle aged in Great Britain. Suggestion of cardiologists and GP in preventing the crisis; Efforts to prevent the development of cardiovascular disease in obese individuals;...

  • Identifying obesity.  // Practice Nurse;10/12/2007, Vol. 34 Issue 6, p6 

    The article reports that the National Obesity Forum is calling for the General Medical Services (GMS) contract to be changed so that primary care teams are encouraged to identify obese patients in Great Britain. The call follows a World Heart Federation survey of 11,000 people in 28 counties,...

  • Bitter sweet. Bates, Jane // Nursing Standard;4/22/2009, Vol. 23 Issue 33, p25 

    The article reflects upon the suggestion by a general practitioner (GP) to increase the price of chocolate to discourage people from eating it and prevent obesity. The author defends the use of chocolate by pointing out its benefits including its ability to boost mood, its magnesium content, and...

  • Obesity agenda.  // Pulse;12/14/2006, Vol. 66 Issue 47, p3 

    The article presents agenda for obesity guidance in Great Britain. It includes training for general practitioners (GP) in prevention interventions, motivational counseling, and support to encourage the use of external weight-management schemes, and to encourage parents to take responsibility in...

  • Bariatric surgery referrals blocked.  // Pulse;Jan2014, p17 

    The article reports that the British National Health Service (NHS) reforms have blocked general practitioners (GPs) in some regions from referring patients for bariatric surgery.

  • The development of a minimal intervention strategy to address overweight and obesity in adult primary care patients in The Netherlands. Fransena, G. A. J.; Hiddinka, G. J.; Koelenb, M. A.; Van Disc, S. J.; Drenthend, A. J. M.; Van Binsbergene, J. J.; Van Woerkum, C. M. J. // Family Practice;Dec2008 Supplement 1, Vol. 25 Issue S1, pi112 

    Background. Currently, overweight and obesity do not receive the attention they deserve from the Dutch GPs, mostly because of a lack of an effective intervention strategy to tackle this difficult health problem.

  • Obesity: a job for GPs or the Government? Mather, James; Deshpande, Anand // Pulse;4/6/2006, Vol. 66 Issue 14, p22 

    Several letters to the editor are presented in response to the letter written by Simon Fisher which discussed the issue of whether obesity in Great Britain is the responsibility of the government or the general practitioner.

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics