TITLE

ONLY FOR MINOR OFFENCES: Community Service in the Netherlands

PUB. DATE
April 2010
SOURCE
European Journal of Probation;2010, Vol. 2 Issue 1, p22
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article analyzes the community service punishment practice of dealing with minor offences in the Netherlands. It is reported that, community service was introduced in the country in the 1960s when prison sentences were criticised for two reasons one being exclusion and stigmatisation of prison sentence, and other being the disappointment concerning the rehabilitative potential of the custodial sentence. It is reported that, the main aim of introducing community service punishment in the country is to increase the effectiveness of sentencing in terms of rehabilitation.
ACCESSION #
66386305

 

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