TITLE

Focal transcranial magnetic stimulation and response bias in a forced-choice task

AUTHOR(S)
Brasil-Neto, J P; Pascual-Leone, A; Valls-Solé, J; Cohen, L G; Hallett, M
PUB. DATE
October 1992
SOURCE
Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry;Oct1992, Vol. 55 Issue 10, p964
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
No abstract available.
ACCESSION #
66062296

 

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