TITLE

Association of practice size and pay-for-performance incentives with the quality of diabetes management in primary care

AUTHOR(S)
Vamos, Eszter P.; Pape, Utz J.; Bottle, Alex; Hamilton, Fiona Louise; Curcin, Vasa; Ng, Anthea; Molokhia, Mariam; Car, Josip; Majeed, Azeem; Millett, Christopher
PUB. DATE
September 2011
SOURCE
CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal;9/6/2011, Vol. 183 Issue 12, pE809
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Background: Not enough is known about the association between practice size and clinical outcomes in primary care. We examined this association between 1997 and 2005, in addition to the impact of the Quality and Outcomes Framework, a pay-for-performance incentive scheme introduced in the United Kingdom in 2004, on diabetes management. Methods: We conducted a retrospective open-cohort study using data from the General Practice Research Database. We enrolled 422 general practices providing care for 154 945 patients with diabetes. Our primary outcome measures were the achievement of national treatment targets for blood pressure, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels and total cholesterol. Results: We saw improvements in the recording of process of care measures, prescribing and achieving intermediate outcomes in all practice sizes during the study period. We saw improvement in reaching national targets after the introduction of the Quality and Outcomes Framework. These improvements significantly exceeded the underlying trends in all practice sizes for achieving targets for cholesterol level and blood pressure, but not for HbA1c level. In 1997 and 2005, there were no significant differences between the smallest and largest practices in achieving targets for blood pressure (1997 odds ratio [OR] 0.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.82 to 1.16; 2005 OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.80 to 1.06 in 2005), cholesterol level (1997 OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.76 to 1.16; 2005 OR 1.1, 95% CI 0.97 to 1.40) and glycated hemoglobin level (1997 OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.55 to 1.14; 2005 OR 1.05, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.19). Interpretation: We found no evidence that size of practice is associated with the quality of diabetes management in primary care. Pay-for-performance programs appear to benefit both large and small practices to a similar extent.
ACCESSION #
65928558

 

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