TITLE

Surgical site marks need monitoring

PUB. DATE
September 2011
SOURCE
Same-Day Surgery;Sep2011, Vol. 35 Issue 9, p94
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on work which the U.S. Joint Commission did with five U.S. hospitals and three ambulatory surgical centers to reduce wrong site surgeries and which resulted in a reduction of wrong site surgeries and found that surgical site marks in patients need monitoring.
ACCESSION #
65832970

 

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