TITLE

Waiting for El Nino

AUTHOR(S)
O'Niel, Graeme
PUB. DATE
January 2002
SOURCE
Ecos;Jan-Mar2002, Issue 110, p6
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on a coupled atmosphere-ocean model with the ability to predict the likely onset of El Nino and La Nina events up to nine months in advance. Development of the model by Dr. Ian Smith of CSIRO Atmospheric Research in Melbourne, Victoria; Key features of the model; Contact information.
ACCESSION #
6560881

 

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