TITLE

4. Farmers markets beat grocery stores on organic prices

PUB. DATE
July 2011
SOURCE
Food & Environment Electronic Digest;Jul2011, p4
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports that people in the U.S. prefer farmers to retail stores for buying fresh fruits and vegetables. It states that they buy directly from farmers to support local agriculture, to reduce pollution as well as to get the certain thing which is unavailable in the retail stores. moreover, it costs less as compared to the retail stores.
ACCESSION #
65537404

 

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