TITLE

Marine: Challenging a Tribunal's ruling

AUTHOR(S)
Horton, Andrew; Harwood, Emily
PUB. DATE
August 2011
SOURCE
Asia Insurance Review;Aug2011, p72
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article examines the ruling of a Tribunal court concerning arbitration proceedings seeking damages for short delivery and for the caking/wetting damage. The Tribunal has upheld the damage claim wherein the owners sought to appeal. It discusses the burden of proof under the Article IV Rule 2 exceptions to the Hague Rules.
ACCESSION #
65264054

 

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